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GJ Medical Tips

Anorexia, or medically known as anorexia nervosa, refers to an eating disorder that results from the great fear of gaining excess weight. It tends to affect both sexes, although it is more common among females, and rarely happens on males. Anorexia and bulimia are both eating disorders; nevertheless, there is a major difference between them in terms of the behavior of the affected person. Anorexics tend to do excessive dieting, while bulimics overeat and prevent weight gain by excessive exercising, using laxatives, self-induced vomiting, and fasting. Anorexia can happen to any person of any age, but it typically affects females of teenage years, with the average onset at 14 years of age.
 
It is estimated that 1 out 10 sufferers of anorexia die due to extreme starvation and dehydration. Apart from that, death can also be due to chronic illnesses and physical disorders that result from undernourishment.
 
Listed below are some symptoms that are seen in people with anorexia. While most people may present with one or two symptoms below and still be considered normal, having three or more of such symptoms will necessitate consultation to a specialist in order to deal with the eating disorder.
  • Drastic weight loss
  • Extreme desire to lose weight
  • Fear of gaining weight even when already underweight
  • Too much exercising and dieting
  • Frequently calculating calorie intake
  • Constipation
  • Parched skin
  • Presence of very thin hair on the arms and face
  • Absence of menstrual periods
  • Low sexual drive
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Difficulty falling asleep
  • Extreme anxiety
  • Frequent sicknesses
  • Physical problems such as
    • anemia
    • fast, irregular heartbeat
    • dental decay due to calcium and minerals deficiency
    • decreased bone density due to calcium and minerals deficiency
 
Anorexia can affect everyone—males or females, young or old, poor or wealthy, illiterate or educated. The guidelines set are not absolute. So if you know or at least someone who is suffering from anorexia, do not hesitate to seek consultation from a physician who specializes in managing diseases of such kind. Your physician can help you sort things out. 
 
Management of anorexia includes a psychotherapy which will help determine the problems that have caused the disease. Antidepressant drugs will also be given by the physician, which will also be of great help to the patient. 
 
You should bear in mind that insisting to an anorexic to "eat something" or forcing them to eat will only worsen the problem. They will try every strategy that they can think of to prevent giving up their control over their weight.

Bulimia refers to the eating disorder that commonly strikes females. The difference between a bulimic and an anorexic is that, the former eats while the latter starves himself. Bulimia also differs from binge eating disorder, as bulimics tend to throw up, use laxatives, diuretics, and diet pills after overeating.
 
Listed below are some symptoms that are seen in people with bulimia. While most people may present with one or two symptoms below and still be considered normal, having three or more of such symptoms will necessitate consultation to a specialist in order to deal with the eating disorder.
  • Frequent cycles of overeating and vomiting
  • Exaggerated fear of gaining weight
  • Strong cravings for food
  • Excessive use of laxatives
  • Excessive use of diuretics
  • Extreme sadness
  • Evidence of erosion on the tooth enamel (brought about by vomiting)
  • Infections on the gum tissue (brought about by vomiting)
  • Cavitations and discolorations of the teeth (brought about by vomiting)
  • Recurrent episodes of nausea
 
Bulimia is a serious psychological illness that can lead to life-threatening physical problems, or even death. The physical damage is brought about by self-induced vomiting and excessive use of different drugs to flush food out of the body.
  • Inflammation of the stomach
  • Inflammation of the pancreas
  • Swelling of the esophagus
  • Increased size of the salivary glands
  • Cavitations and discolorations of the teeth (brought about by vomiting)
  • Infections on the gum tissue (brought about by vomiting)
  • Dehydration and decreased blood potassium levels
    • irregular heartbeats
    • muscle spasms
  • death (if left untreated)
 
More often than not, bulimia is caused by family problems or problems at school. The victims are usually the overachievers and perfectionists, especially if they think they cannot achieve what is expected of them.
 
Low self-confidence and extreme sadness usually leads to bulimia. And according to studies, 50 per cent of bulimics have experienced physical and/or sexual abuse.
 
Management of bulimia includes a psychotherapy which will help identify and solve the problems that have caused the disease. Antidepressant drugs will also be given by the physician, which will also be of great help to the patient.  Other things that can help determine the cause of the disease include having a food diary and a record of the overeating episodes.
 
If you know or at least someone who is suffering from bulimia, do not hesitate to seek consultation from a physician or therapist who specializes in handling diseases of such kind. They can help you sort things out. 

And also, you should bear in mind that insisting to a bulimic to change or stop their behavior will only worsen the problem. Seek help from health professionals in order to determine if there’s something you can do to help the patient recover.

Just like bulimia, binge eating disorder, or otherwise called BED, is an illness characterized by overeating. This disorder can result to stress and depression, and can have harmful effects on the patient’s psychological and physical health.
 
BED includes a string or a pattern of behavior that develops over time. If you or someone you know possesses at least three of the following behaviors listed below, then you might be suffering from BED:
  • Eating very fast
  • Eating even you are already full
  • Eating even when you are not hungry
  • Eating all by yourself or hiding just to eat
  • Feeling sad and bothered after overeating
 
Definitely, overeating during special occasions and events does not count as binge eating. Binge eating just happen anytime, and more often than not, it is caused by undesirable feelings of anxiety, depression, or stress.
 
Although binge eating primarily appears in people who are overweight, it can also strike in people of normal body weight. What drives overweight people overeat is the depression caused by weight gain, or the failure to reduce weight. On the other hand, for people of normal weight, overeating is usually triggered by depression, stress, or anxiety brought about by unpleasant happenings in their life.
 
BED can be treated. And the first step in doing so is creating a food diary that will help determine the episodes of overeating—the time, date, type and amount of foods consumed, and the feelings that have triggered the behavior. Once the causes have been determined, psychotherapy along with antidepressant drugs such as Zoloft will be given to the patient to help stop overeating.
 
If you know or at least someone who is suffering from BED, do not hesitate to seek consultation from a physician who specializes in managing diseases of such kind.

You should bear in mind that bullying or persuading a binge eater to control his or her eating habits will only make the problem worse. It is always recommended to seek consultation to a specialist first, so you will know that right thing to do.

Diabetes Mellitus can be classified into two types:
 
Type I Diabetes Mellitus is otherwise known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, or IDDM. This type of diabetes is characterized by the decreased production of insulin, due to the damage of the beta cells of the pancreas. The damage can be brought about by infection or by an autoimmune disorder. Genetics also play a major role in the development of this type of diabetes. IDDM is also called juvenile diabetes, since it usually occurs at age 12.
 
IDDM must be treated as soon as detected. If not, it may lead to hyperglycemia, dehydration, and protein wasting. IDDM can be controlled by regular monitoring of the blood sugar levels, taking appropriate medications, and switching to the diet prescribed by the physician.
 
IDDM can affect the tiny vessels that supply blood to the retina of the eye, kidneys, and extremities. If the disease is poorly-controlled or untreated, the patient may experience blurring of vision (which can lead to blindness), nausea and vomiting, irritability, and poor wound healing.  And long-term absence of treatment will ultimately result to death.
 
On the other hand, the second type of diabetes is the Type II Diabetes Mellitus, which is also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or NIDDM. Contrary to the first type which affects children, this one is usually detected at the 4th or 5th decade of life, and therefore also known as adult-onset diabetes. In NIDDM, adequate amounts of insulin are produced, but the cells just can’t use it properly. The factors that contribute in the onset of NIDDM include genetics, pregnancy, and obesity. This type of diabetes progresses slowly, and can be controlled by switching to a healthy diet.
 
NIDDM is detected by performing the glucose tolerance test. In such test, the patient is given a beverage high in sugar, and then for the next six to eight hours, the blood sugar levels are checked in order to determine how fast the body is using up the sugar consumed. NIDDM, if left untreated, can lead to damage to the arteries and arteriosclerosis, which in turn, can lead to heart attack and stroke.
 
If you know or suspect that you or someone you know is suffering from diabetes, it is important to seek consultation from a medical professional. Consult your physician if you notice any changes in your condition or if there are any additional symptoms that occurred.
 
If you wish to learn more about diabetes mellitus, just click on the following links:

Diuretics, which can be bought with or without prescription, can be harmful to the health, or even deadly when used inappropriately.
 
Diuretics are drugs which work to flush out water from the body by increasing urine output. In this process, there’s also a loss of essential electrolytes such as potassium. The weight loss produced by diuretics is only temporary, because the body will just replace loss water from any liquid taken in by the user. If you reduce your intake of fluid while you’re on diuretics, it can lead to life-threatening health problems, or even death. 
 
Diuretics are prescribed by physicians when the patient needs to reduce the water retained in his or her body due to specific illnesses. When used as prescribed, and monitored regularly by a physician, these drugs are effective and safe.
 
Sometimes, people suffering from anorexia and bulimia take diuretics to aid in weight loss, since they know that the drug works to reduce the body's water. However, what they don’t know is that, the body reacts to this by beginning to retain more water, which produces a bloated feeling. And when the user starts to feel that, they increase the dosage of diuretics they take, making things worse.
 
The continuous, regular intake of diuretics as a weight loss aid can actually lead to life-threatening medical conditions such as:
  • congestive heart failure
  • constipation
  • convulsions
  • extreme dehydration
  • fast, irregular heartbeats
  • fatigue
  • heart attack and stroke
  • hypertension
  • intense headaches
  • kidney failure
  • urinary tract infections
  • death
 
Take note that the chronic use of diuretics leads to the body’s dependency to it. Suddenly stopping the use of such drug after long-term use can result to life-threatening problems, so consultation and assistance from a medical professional is necessary.

If you know or suspect someone who is abusing diuretics, get them to seek medical help before the drugs cause harm to their health and life.
 
If you have taken diuretic drugs as a weight loss aid, or if you have recovered from using abusing such drug, share to us your story to help and persuade others to stop and seek help.

Laxatives are drugs that work to promote bowel movements. They are available in different forms-- herbal, liquids, and pills—and can be bought with or without prescription. Today, laxatives have been used increasingly as weight loss aid. Unfortunately, these drugs are actually not an effective in losing weight. This is because most of the nutrients, fats, and calories from food are absorbed by the small intestines. What is passed into the large intestines are just water and undigested food materials. When you take laxatives, what happens is you just remove these remaining food wastes from the large intestine, along with a little water loss.
 
People who are suffering from anorexia and bulimia often use laxatives to aid in the quick elimination of any food that they ate. Sadly, instead of losing weight, what actually happens is that, they just reduce excess water, which prompts the body to start retaining water in order to fight the forced dehydration. And then, when the anorexic or bulimic starts to feel or look bloated, what they do is they increase the amount of laxatives that they take, making things worse.
 
The continuous, regular intake of laxatives as a weight loss aid can actually lead to life-threatening medical conditions such as:
  • blurred vision
  • confusion
  • constipation
  • convulsions
  • death
  • diarrhea
  • excessive perspiration
  • congestive heart failure
  • difficulty falling asleep
  • extreme dehydration
  • fast, irregular heartbeats
  • fatigue
  • hallucinations
  • heart attack and stroke
  • high fevers
  • hyperactivity
  • hypertension
  • intense headaches
  • kidney failure
  • nervousness
  • restlessness
  • tremors
  • urinary tract infections
  • vomiting
Obesity: A person is said to be obese when his or her body weight is 20% over the ideal weight, with respect to the age, height, and sex.

Those who are obese must consider switching to a low-calorie diet and formulating an exercise regime in order to shed excess weight before their condition can cause harmful effects to their health.

On the other hand, for those who are starting to get obese, but whose weight is still considered to be within their ideal weight range, modifying their eating and exercising practices is needed in order for them get back to their recommended weight.

Obesity has a lot of effects that can be harmful to a person’s health. And such effects include the following:
  • Thickening of the walls of the arteries (arteriosclerosis)
  • High blood pressure levels
  • Heart attack and stroke
  • Varicose veins
  • Cancer of the colon
  • Cancer of the prostate
  • Kidney stones
  • Joint and bone problems
  • Psychological problems
  • Diabetes mellitus
 
In general, the use of charts listing the “average weights” or “calorie requirements” is not recommended, because there are a lot of factors that must be considered for these. These charts only give a general guideline, or a rough estimate about those things. The chart below, for instance, did not consider factors such as sex, fitness level, BMI, etc. So you should use such chart only to have a rough idea at what weight will you be already considered obese. The weights indicated below are just approximate weights:
 
Obesity Chart (Approximate Weight)
Height Obesity Weight Height Obesity Weight

5' 0" 153 pounds 5' 7" 191 pounds
5' 1" 159 pounds 5' 8" 197 pounds
5' 2" 164 pounds 5' 9" 203 pounds
5' 3" 169 pounds 5' 10" 209 pounds
5' 4" 175 pounds 5' 11" 215 pounds
5' 5" 180 pounds 6' 0" 221 pounds
5' 6" 186 pounds 6' 1" 227 pounds
 
 

Pills: Due to the obsession of many people to lose weight, a lot of over-the-counter pills are available on the market, each claiming that they can help you lose weight by blocking fats, speeding up your metabolism, and increasing the amount of fat you lose during exercise. Unfortunately, most of these claims are either exaggerated or untrue, and are made only to lure customers into buying the pills. And worse, it can be difficult to sort out which ones are telling the truth and which ones are not.
 
Thyroid extracts, which are derived from animals, are one of the most common ingredients of weight loss pills and supplements. These extracts work by speeding up the body’s metabolism, similar to the action of the thyroid hormones found in humans. Although such substance can be quite effective, it can also produce the following side effects.
  • Bulging eyes
  • Diarrhea
  • Dehydration
  • Excessive sweating
  • Fast, irregular heartbeat
  • Nervousness
 
The next category of weight loss pills are the fat burners. As the name suggests, these pills work by helping your body burn more fat. While the fat burners really do increase the rate of metabolism, their other claims are not entirely true. This type of weight loss pills typically contains ephedra, ephedrine, guarana, ma huang, and high amounts of caffeine.

Ephedrine is drug with a structure similar to amphetamines. Adverse drug reactions associated with ephedrine includes hypertension, intense headaches, heart attacks, seizure attacks, and death. According to FDA, the daily intake of ephedrine should not exceed 8mg, for a period of one week. Unfortunately, most manufacturers do not include ephedrine in the list of ingredients of their products. Therefore, it is wise to use any weight loss pills with great caution.
 
While there are weight loss pills which really work, it is still recommended to use those which are clearly-labeled and includes a list of the ingredients found in the product. In addition to that, you must discuss with your doctor any weight loss programs that you are planning to start, especially those which will involve the use of weight loss pills.
 
Another important thing to remember is that, the FDA does not have control over all kinds of supplements that are sold online. Although this is not to say that all FDA-approved drugs are completely safe, if there’s no regulation, harmful products will be able to circulate in the market and cause harm to the consumers. And this will go on unless the government performs studies or learn about problems from such products.
 
Chitosan is a substance derived from chitin, or the protective covering of crustaceans such as crabs and lobsters. It is used in herbal weight loss supplements due to the belief that it prevents weight gain by binding to fat, although this claim is not actually backed up with clear, positive results from studies. According to studies, there’s really no fat elimination that occurs when using products that are chitosan-based. Therefore, instead to using chitosan diet pills that are not proven to be effective, it is better if you will just limit you fat intake and switch to a healthy diet—now that’s more helpful.
 
Pyruvate is another compound found in some weight loss pills. Known to be a "fat burner," this substance is not actually proven to produce significant weight loss. The studies performed by colleges and private laboratories found out that pyruvate is not even present in the blood streams of people who used it. And also, it should be noted that taking excessive amounts of this substance can only result to bloating and diarrhea.
 
Despite being banned by the FDA over ten years ago, phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is still used as an ingredient in non-prescription weight loss pills. This substance is added mostly in imported diet pills and those pills that can be bought online. According to studies, PPA is too harmful for the health, as there are over 142 adverse reactions associated with this drug, which includes hypertension, intense headaches, stroke, and even death. Non-prescription pills such as Acutrim and Dexatrim are known to contain PPA. When choosing your weight loss pill, be sure that it does not have PPA as an ingredient. If it is one of the ingredients listed, then don’t buy that pill, otherwise, you may suffer from the serious complications brought about by this drug. Moreover, there’s no significant difference on the results that you can get from a weight loss program that includes diet and exercise versus a program that includes the use of diet pills containing PPA.
 
Prescription weight loss pills can be bought only from your physician. These supplements help shed excess weight by controlling appetite, through the aid of exercise and diet. Some of them functions to prevent fats from being absorbed by the body. Although they are FDA-approved, not all prescription diet pills are safe. 
 
What will be discussed further under this topic are some of the most popular prescription weight loss medications. We tried to discuss each one as detailed as possible, but it is still recommended to consult your physician if you are planning to use any of these.
 
Before trying to buy and use any of the weight loss medications, outlined in this article, it is advisable to consult your physician first in order to avoid encountering any serious problems associated with the use of these drugs. 

Adipex, also known as Adipex-P, or by its generic name Phentermine, is drug used to reduce appetite and promote weight loss in obese individuals. Nevertheless, it is effective only when used in conjunction with diet and exercise.
 
Adverse effects: Adipex is known to produce the following adverse effects:
·         anxiety
·         blurred vision
·         constipation
·         dry mouth
·         difficulty falling asleep
·         lightheadedness (worsens with alcohol use)
·         nausea
·         restlessness
·         tremor
·         other serious side effects including:
o   confusion
o   hallucination
o   extreme hypertension
o   intense headaches
o   irregular heartbeat
o   unusual behavior
 
Special precautions: Adipex should not be used by people with any of the conditions listed below. If you are experiencing from any of the following, it is recommended to consult your physician before starting to use the drug:
·         anxiety disorder
·         arteriosclerosis (hardening of the walls of the artery)
·         diabetes
·         emotional instability
·         glaucoma
·         heart disorders
·         hypertension
·         hyperthyroidism
·         pregnancy
·         seizure
 
Drug interactions: Adipex reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Adipex:
·         antidepressants
·         antihistamines
·         appetite suppressants
·         caffeine
·         medications for cough and colds
·         monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
·         nasal decongestants
·         other weight loss supplements
 
Drug dependence: Adipex can be addicting. Before stopping the medication, it is recommended to consult your physician first, to avoid any psychological or physical problems that might be encountered from suddenly withdrawing from this drug after taking it for weeks.
 
Warning: Adipex must not be used by breastfeeding mothers. It can be secreted in breastmilk, and can be harmful for your infant’s health

Bontril, also known by its generic name Phendimetrazine, is drug used to reduce appetite and promote weight loss in obese individuals. Nevertheless, it is effective only when used in conjunction with diet and exercise.
 
Adverse effects: Bontril is known to produce the following adverse effects:
·         anxiety
·         blurred vision
  • chest pain
·         constipation
  • diarrhea
·         difficulty breathing
·         dry mouth
·         difficulty falling asleep
  • decreased sex drive
  • irritability
·         lightheadedness (worsens with alcohol use)
  • mood changes
·         nausea
  • pain or difficulty in urinating
  • pounding heart
  • swelling
·         tremor
·         other serious side effects including:
o   allergic reaction
o   confusion
o   hallucination
o   extreme hypertension
o   intense headaches
o   irregular heartbeat
o   unusual behavior
 
Special precautions: Bontril should not be used by people with any of the conditions listed below. If you are experiencing from any of the following, it is recommended to consult your physician before starting to use the drug:
·         anxiety disorder
·         arteriosclerosis (hardening of the walls of the artery)
·         diabetes
·         emotional instability
·         glaucoma
·         heart disorders
·         hypertension
·         hyperthyroidism
·         pregnancy
·         seizure
 
Drug interactions: Bontril reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Bontril:
·         antidepressants
·         antihistamines
·         antihypertensives
·         appetite suppressants
·         caffeine
·         medications for cough and colds
·         monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
·         nasal decongestants
·         seizure medications
·         other weight loss supplements
 
Drug dependence: Bontril can be addicting. Before stopping the medication, it is recommended to consult your physician first, to avoid any psychological or physical problems that might be encountered from suddenly withdrawing from this drug after taking it for weeks.
 
Warning: Bontril must not be used by breastfeeding mothers. It can be secreted in breastmilk, and can be harmful for your infant’s health.

Ionamin, also known as Ionamin hydrochloride, or by its generic name Phentermine, is drug used to reduce appetite and promote weight loss in obese individuals. Nevertheless, it is effective only when used in conjunction with diet and exercise.
 
Adverse effects: Ionamin is known to produce the following adverse effects:
·         anxiety
·         blurred vision
·         constipation
·         dry mouth
·         difficulty falling asleep
  • decreased sex drive
  • irritability
·         lightheadedness (worsens with alcohol use)
·         nausea
·         tremor
·         other serious side effects including:
o   allergic reaction
o   confusion
o   hallucination
o   extreme hypertension
o   intense headaches
o   irregular heartbeat
o   unusual behavior
 
Special precautions: Ionamin should not be used by people with any of the conditions listed below. If you are experiencing from any of the following, it is recommended to consult your physician before starting to use the drug:
·         anxiety disorder
·         arteriosclerosis (hardening of the walls of the artery)
·         diabetes
·         emotional instability
·         glaucoma
·         heart disorders
·         hypertension
·         hyperthyroidism
·         pregnancy
·         seizure
 
Drug interactions: Ionamin reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Ionamin:
·         antidepressants
·         appetite suppressants
·         caffeine
·         medications for cough and colds
·         monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
·         nasal decongestants
·         other weight loss supplements
 
Drug dependence: Ionamin can be addicting. Before stopping the medication, it is recommended to consult your physician first, to avoid any psychological or physical problems that might be encountered from suddenly withdrawing from this drug after taking it for weeks.
 
Warning: Ionamin must not be used by breastfeeding mothers. It can be secreted in breastmilk, and can be harmful for your infant’s health.

Leptoprin is a drug used to reduce appetite and promote weight loss in obese individuals. Nevertheless, it is effective only when used in conjunction with diet and exercise.
 
Adverse effects: Leptoprin is known to produce the following adverse effects:
·         anxiety
·         blurred vision
·         dry mouth
·         difficulty falling asleep
·         lightheadedness (worsens with alcohol use)
·         nausea
·         tremor
·         other serious side effects including:
o    allergic reaction
o    confusion
o    hallucination
o    heart attack
o    extreme hypertension
o    intense headaches
o    irregular heartbeat
o    shortness of breath
o    stroke
o    unusual behavior
 
Special precautions: Leptoprin should not be used by people with any of the conditions listed below. If you are experiencing from any of the following, it is recommended to consult your physician before starting to use the drug:
  • anxiety disorder
  • arteriosclerosis (hardening of the walls of the artery)
  • diabetes
  • emotional instability
  • enlarged prostate
  • glaucoma
  • heart disorders
  • hypertension
  • hyperthyroidism
  • intense headache
  • pain and difficulty in urinating
  • pregnancy
  • seizure
 
Drug interactions: Leptoprin reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Leptoprin:
·         anticoagulants (blood thinners)
·         antidepressants
·         antihistamines
·         antihypertensives
·         appetite suppressants
·         caffeine
·         medications for cough and colds
·         monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
·         nasal decongestants
·         other weight loss supplements
·         seizure medications
 
Drug dependence: Leptoprin is neither addicting nor habit-forming.
 
Warning: Leptoprin must not be used by breastfeeding mothers. It can be secreted in breastmilk, and can be harmful for your infant’s health
 
Since Leptoprin contains caffeine and aspirin, expectant mothers must not use this drug, otherwise, there will be complications during labor.
 
Take note that Leptoprin also has ephedra, which can cause heart attack, seizures, stroke, and death. You must consult your physician first before using this medication. It is also very important to take the recommended dose only, as overdosing can result to heart attack and stroke.

Mazindol, also known as Mazanor or Sanorex, is drug used to reduce appetite and promote weight loss in obese individuals. Nevertheless, it is effective only when used in conjunction with diet and exercise.
 
Adverse effects: Mazindol is known to produce the following adverse effects:
·         anxiety
·         blurred vision
  • chest pain
·         constipation
  • diarrhea
·         difficulty breathing
·         dry mouth and bad taste in the mouth
·         difficulty falling asleep
  • decreased sex drive
  • irritability
·         lightheadedness (worsens with alcohol use)
  • mood changes
·         nausea
  • pain or difficulty in urinating
  • pounding heart
·         tremor
·         other serious side effects including:
o   allergic reaction
o   confusion
o   hallucination
o   extreme hypertension
o   intense headaches
o   irregular heartbeat
o   unusual behavior
 
Special precautions: Mazindol should not be used by people with any of the conditions listed below. If you are experiencing from any of the following, it is recommended to consult your physician before starting to use the drug:
·         anxiety disorder
·         arteriosclerosis (hardening of the walls of the artery)
·         diabetes
·         emotional instability
·         glaucoma
·         heart disorders
·         hypertension
·         hyperthyroidism
·         pregnancy
·         seizure
 
Drug interactions: Mazindol reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Mazindol:
·         antidepressants
·         antihypertensives
·         appetite suppressants
·         insulin
·         monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
·         nasal decongestants
·         other weight loss supplements
 
Drug dependence: Mazindol can be addicting. Before stopping the medication, it is recommended to consult your physician first, to avoid any psychological or physical problems that might be encountered from suddenly withdrawing from this drug after taking it for weeks.
 
Warning: Mazindol must not be used by breastfeeding mothers. It can be secreted in breastmilk, and can be harmful for your infant’s health.
 
Mazindol can be harmful to an unborn baby. For women, they need to make sure that they are not pregnant before starting to use this medication. And those who are planning to get pregnant during the treatment must not take this drug.
 

Meridia, also known by its generic name sibutramine, is drug used to reduce appetite and promote weight loss in obese individuals.
 
Adverse effects: Meridia is known to produce the following adverse effects: (please also refer to the warning section at the last part of this page)
·         anxiety
·         constipation
·         dry mouth
·         hypertension (should be checked regularly)
·         lightheadedness
·         mild headache
·         sleepiness
·         sleeping problems
·         tremor
·         trouble concentrating
·         other serious side effects including:
o    allergic reaction
o    confusion
o    hallucination
o    extreme hypertension
o    intense headaches
o    irregular heartbeat
o    unusual behavior
 
Drug interactions: Meridia reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Meridia:
·         antidepressants
·         antihistamines
·         antihypertensives
·         appetite suppressants
·         cough medications
·         lithium
·         migraine drugs
·         monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
·         narcotics
·         nasal decongestants
·         sedatives
·         seizure medications
·         tryptophan
·         other weight loss supplements
 
Drug dependence: Meridia can be addicting if used for long periods. Before stopping the medication, it is recommended to consult your physician first, to avoid any psychological or physical problems that might be encountered from suddenly withdrawing from this drug after taking it.
 
Warning: Although it is still not known ifMeridia can be secreted in breastmilk, breastfeeding mothers must not use this drug.
 
In our research, it was found out that around 29 deaths (this has increased to 49 in the recent updates) were directly due to the use of Meridia. The Public Citizen group of Ralph Nader has identified that using such drug can lead to life-threatening side-effects, and even death, which has prompted them to propose the ban and recall of Meridia through the FDA. The cause of death associated with the drug is mainly due to PPH, which stands for primary pulmonary hypertension, or the same disease which has caused the ban and recall of other medications such as FenPhen and Redux. Take note that the FDA’s approval for Meridia was marginal, and that there are a number of groups saying that the tests previously conducted to prove the safety of the drug was inadequate. To learn more about these issues, you can search for cases against the Abbott Laboratories regarding this drug.
 
Update: Just recently, the FDA issued reports regarding 54 women who used Meridia and then suffered from stillbirths, miscarriage, and giving birth to babies with defects. These are all attributed to the use of the drug during pregnancy. There are a number of babies which were born with defective hearts. This type of malformations and defects were actually seen in laboratory testing of Meridia in animals.

Tenuate, also known by its generic name diethylproprion, is a drug used to reduce appetite and promote weight loss in obese individuals. Nevertheless, it is effective only when used in conjunction with diet and exercise.
 
Adverse effects: Tenuate is known to produce the following adverse effects:
  • anxiety
  • blurred vision
  • constipation
  • decreased sex drive
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty falling asleep
  • dry mouth
  • lightheadedness (worsens with alcohol use)
  • headache
  • nervousness
  • restlessness
  • tremor
·         other serious side effects that must be reported to your physician including:
o    allergic reaction
o    confusion
o    hallucination
o    extreme hypertension
o    intense headaches
o    irregular heartbeat
o    unusual behavior
 
Special precautions: Tenuate should not be used by people with any of the conditions listed below. If you are experiencing from any of the following, it is recommended to consult your physician before starting to use the drug:
  • anxiety disorder
  • arteriosclerosis (hardening of the walls of the artery)
  • brain disorders
  • diabetes
  • drug allergies
  • glaucoma
  • heart disorders
  • hypertension
  • hyperthyroidism
  • pregnancy
  • seizure
  • spinal cord disorders
  • substance abuse (drugs and alcohol)
 
Drug interactions: Tenuate reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Tenuate:
  • antidepressants
  • antihypertensives
  • furazolidone
  • guanadrel
  • guanethidine
  • insulin injections
  • monamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
 
Drug dependence: Tenuate can be addicting. Before stopping the medication, it is recommended to consult your physician first, to avoid any psychological or physical problems that might be encountered from suddenly withdrawing from this drug after taking it for weeks.
 
Warning: Tenuate must not be used by breastfeeding mothers. It can be secreted in breastmilk, and can be harmful for your infant’s health.
 
Because of the problems associated with the use of Tenuate, it is recommended that before undergoing any surgery, emergency treatment, or dental procedures, make sure to tell your attending physician/dentist if you are taking such drug.

Xenical, also known by its generic name Orlistat, is a drug which works to reduce the absorption of fat from diet by 30%. It does so by rendering the fats undigestible, facilitating its easy elimination from the body. Nevertheless, the effects of this drug tends to decline over time, after about a period of 1-2 years.
 
Adverse effects: Xenical is known to produce the following adverse effects:
  • beta-carotene deficiency (necessitating the use of supplements)
  • vitamin D, E, and K deficiency (necessitating the use of supplements)
  • flatulence
  • inability to control or stop bowel movements
  • more frequent bowel movements
  • oily/fatty stools
  • oily discharge
  • soft, watery stools
  • strong, sudden urge to use the bathroom
  • other serious side effects that must be reported to your physician including:
    • allergic reaction
    • skin eruptions
    • swelling
 
Special precautions: Xenical should not be used by people with any of the conditions listed below. If you are experiencing from any of the following, it is recommended to consult your physician before starting to use the drug:
  • diabetes
  • drug allergies
  • eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia)
  • gallbladder disorders
  • high blood cholesterol levels
  • hyperglycemia
  • hypertension
  • kidney stones
  • pregnancy
  • sprue (marked by the presence of anemia, weight loss, and persistent diarrhea)
  • steatorrhea or excessively oily stools
 
Drug interactions: Xenical reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Xenical:
  • anti-cholesterol drugs
  • appetite suppressants
  • cyclosporine
  • Neoral
  • Sandimmune
  • Warfarin (Coumadin)
  • other weight loss medications
 
Drug dependence: It is not yet known if Xenical is addicting. Nevertheless, before stopping the medication, it is always recommended to consult your physician first.
 
Warning: Xenical must not be used by breastfeeding mothers. It can be secreted in breastmilk, and can be harmful for your infant’s health.
 
Since Xenical works to reduce weight by blocking the absorption of fats, it can also halt the absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins A (specifically beta-carotene), D, E, and K. Ask your doctor about these supplements that you need to take while on Xenical.

Didrex, also known by its generic name benzphetamine, is a drug used to reduce appetite and promote weight loss in obese individuals. Nevertheless, it is effective only when used in conjunction with diet and exercise.
 
Adverse effects: Didrex is known to produce the following adverse effects:
  • anxiety
  • arteriosclerosis (hardening of the walls of the arteries)
  • diabetes
  • drug allergies
  • glaucoma
  • heart disorders
  • hypertension
  • hyperthyroidism
  • pregnancy (didrex is a known teratogen- causes defects on an unborn baby)
  • seizure
  • substance abuse (drugs and alcohol)
 
Drug interactions: Didrex reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Didrex:
  • antidepressants
  • antihypertensives
  • Furazolidone
  • Guanadrel
  • Guanethidine
  • insulin therapy
  • monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
  • seizure medications
 
Drug dependence: Didrex can be addicting. Before stopping the medication, it is recommended to consult your physician first, to avoid any psychological or physical problems that might be encountered from suddenly withdrawing from this drug after taking it for weeks.
 
Warning: Didrex must not be used by breastfeeding mothers. It can be secreted in breastmilk, and can be harmful for your infant’s health.
 
Didrex is a known teratogen, meaning, it can cause defects in an unborn baby. Those who are pregnant or are planning to become pregnant should not take this drug. And while on Didrex, it is important to use birth control methods in order to be sure that pregnancy will be avoided.
 
Because of the problems associated with the use of Didrex, it is recommended that before you undergo any medical or dental procedures, make sure to tell your attending physician/dentist if you are taking such drug.
 
If you have experienced taking Didrex, share to us your story. Make sure to give your initials, city, and state so we can include those in your story.
 
Phentermine is the generic drug used to reduce appetite and promote weight loss in obese individuals. Nevertheless, it is effective only when used in conjunction with diet and exercise. This weight loss medication is also known by the following brand names:
·         Adipex-P
·         Fastin
·         Ionamin
·         Obenix
·         Obephen
·         Oby-Cap
·         Oby-Trim
·         Phentercot
·         Phentride
·         Pro-Fast HS
·         Pro-Fast SA
·         Pro-Fast SR
·         Teramine
 
Adverse effects: Phentermine is known to produce the following adverse effects:
  • anxiety
  • blurred vision
  • constipation
  • decreased sex drive
  • difficulty falling asleep
  • dry mouth
  • headache
  • irritability
  • lightheadedness (worsens with alcohol use)
  • nausea
  • tremor
·         other serious side effects that must be reported to your physician including:
o    allergic reaction
o    confusion
o    hallucination
o    extreme hypertension
o    intense headaches
o    irregular heartbeat
o    unusual behavior
 
Special precautions: Phentermine should not be used by people with any of the conditions listed below. If you are experiencing from any of the following, it is recommended to consult your physician before starting to use the drug:
  • anxiety
  • arteriosclerosis (hardening of the walls of the arteries)
  • diabetes
  • emotional instability
  • glaucoma
  • heart disorders
  • hypertension
  • hyperthyroidism
  • pregnancy
  • seizure
 
Drug interactions: Phentermine reacts negatively with many prescription and non-prescription drugs. If you are currently taking any of the following drugs, talk to your physician first before starting to use Phentermine:
  • antidepressants
  • antihypertensives
  • appetite suppressants
  • cough medications
  • monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors
  • nasal decongestants
  • other weight loss medications
 
Drug dependence: Phentermine can be addicting. Before stopping the medication, it is recommended to consult your physician first, to avoid any psychological or physical problems that might be encountered from suddenly withdrawing from this drug after taking it for weeks.
 
Warning: Phentermine must not be used by breastfeeding mothers. It can be secreted in breastmilk, and can be harmful for your infant’s health.